Author Topic: Making panniers for the TTR (now a rear rack)  (Read 11968 times)

brockmub

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Making panniers for the TTR (now a rear rack)
« on: April 26, 2016, 10:01:04 AM »
Not sure where I should put this, maybe here or maybe out at advrider.  I took delivery of the TTR 250 that my brother has been learning on over the winter.  It needs to be prepped for his first dual sport ride in the Hills this June.  It would be nice to have some racks for the bike but no one makes any that fit the price range of the low buck bike.  The guys over in the welding shop owe me a few favors since I helped them with the computers on their CNC machines.  What do you think about building something with the infamous ammo cans?  I could use some advice too, so should I post here or at Advrider? 

I also forgot the tags to post images.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 10:02:47 AM by brockmub »

Lonesome Dave

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2016, 11:09:41 AM »
Pelican cases work well, you can find them used on ebay and others.  And they're lighter.  Great Buffalo might have a set looking for a new home.  I have some but I don't remember how big they are.
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Bogus Jim

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2016, 11:28:47 AM »
sleddog might have some tips for making racks. I saw some pictures of his work (not sure if it was on here or advrider) and they looked factory.

brockmub

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2016, 12:11:24 PM »
OK, Let's give this a try.

Bringing the TTR back, looks great from a distance but not so good close up.



Here's my cases.

« Last Edit: April 26, 2016, 12:26:48 PM by brockmub »

greatbuffalo

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2016, 02:13:42 PM »
20 mm ammo cans will be far too to heavy in my opinion. The smaller one are just too small. I would go with soft bags, personally, and just fasion a rack to keep them out of the spokes. Used soft bags can be had cheap on the used

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greatbuffalo

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2016, 02:18:18 PM »
I didn't scroll down far enough to see those ammo cans, far differentvthan the ones I'm familier with. They look like they could be workable. What are the dimensions of those cases?

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brockmub

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2016, 02:50:22 PM »
The 25mm boxes are nearly square, somewhere around 14 x 14 1/2.  Even though I'd run bolts through the sides, they'd be nearly weather proof.  I do have a pair of soft bags from my Bandit that would probably touch the exhaust or get into the rear tire.  They would also not be very easy to hose down after running through some mud.  What I can't figure out is where I'm going to tie these boxes/panniers into the frame or subframe.  There's just not much back there to bolt into.

sleddog

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2016, 04:33:32 PM »
Brad, I'd suggest to go with soft cases. Do like Jim suggested & have some racks made to keep them off of the exhaust etc. If your'e patient soft bags can be found pretty cheap.

Plus, ammo cans can only be used on KLR's along with a Walmart basket...............

Lonesome Dave

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2016, 05:35:27 PM »
Does the TTR have a metal sub-frame?  If it doesn't, I think the only thing you can use is a softbag.
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Bogus Jim

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2016, 06:52:45 PM »
Does the TTR have a metal sub-frame?  If it doesn't, I think the only thing you can use is a softbag.

I think it is steel, but the owner's manual claims a max load of 198 lbs. The manual popped up on google.

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/assets/service/manuals/2006/lit-11626-19-30_1198.pdf

The water-proof or water-resistant soft bags like giant loop and wolfman will rinse off mud pretty easily, but they're also probably a lot more money than you want to spend.

brockmub

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2016, 10:02:41 PM »
Uhmmm Boy that weight limit doesn't leave me much room for anything extra.  I'd better make sure I go to the bathroom before I ride because I'm right at 198 most days.  My brother is well north of that number so that dramatically changes my plans.  Just for curiosity I set my soft cases from the B1200 on it just to see what they look like.



This is with them in the position that I think they should be in, however the straps don't go under the seat and they would need a light frame to hold them away from the exhaust and out of the tire on the other side.  So then with them slid forward over the side number plate.  They wouldn't need a frame and the plastics as well as the seat would hold them into place.



Is this just a fools errand? Should we just not carry anything on that bike? I hoping that I'm able to find an equipped DRZ by June and there would be a rack on there for a bag and fuel.

ryani

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2016, 12:02:25 AM »
I bought a set of h2o proof bags and welded up a small frame to keep them off the exhaust and side panels of the old klr. No options for my bike either.

It works great. Extra gal of gas too.
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sandhillrider

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2016, 12:09:19 AM »
The only rack I could find for the ttr was the cycle rack on eBay. Maybe you could copy it.
The overseas TTR had a different subframe that I think was heavier wich allowed more rack options. As for the ability to carry weight I sold mine to a guy weighing 300 pounds and he loves it, think the Yamaha number is very conservative. Loved the TTR but gave up on it after trying to find some mods. Not much out there so most have to be home made.

brockmub

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2016, 11:40:08 AM »

You guys are the best! Keep the suggestions coming sleddog, ryani, Bogus Jim, sandhillrider, Lonesome Dave, and great buffalo!

I'm rethinking this whole idea of the side panniers and am leaning now towards what Sandhill suggested.  Cyclerack is pretty well known for their racks and I first came across them in my research of TW200 options. Their design is probably ok, so long as it doesn't hold much for example a gas can and dry bag. My concern with the design of the Cyclerack is how it just loops under the bottom of the rear subframe, secured with a bolt on each side. Here's a pic from their website.



So I think it would be better if it bolted directly to the frame instead of looping under it.  Shouldn't I be able to make a bracket that connects here on the right side in the two holes above the rear brake?  These spots are already threaded and I found two 10mm bolts for them.  Probably a lock washer and some LocTite would be a good idea.




And then here on the left side where the chain roller guards are?  Also, isn't the quick link on backwards in the pic?


Bogus Jim

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Re: Making panniers for the TTR
« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2016, 12:50:55 PM »
I am wondering if that 198 lbs. in the manual is a typo. That's hardly enough for a big rider. The max load for XT250 is around 350 lbs. and for WR250R I think it's 390 lbs. or something. WRR has a pretty strong subframe though.

Here's a few pics of a homemade rack from advrider. Looks like he used those two threaded holes to mount a brake caliper guard.